Clicky

When Did They Stop Making Pull Tabs on Beer Cans?

Last Updated on June 6, 2022 by Lauren Beck

The pull tab, or pop top, was invented in the early 1960s by Robert W. Anderson and first used on beer cans in 1963. The pull tab revolutionized can opening and made it much easier to open a can of beer. Pull tabs were very popular for many years, but eventually fell out of favor due to concerns about environmental pollution and safety. Today, most beer cans are opened with a can opener or a church key. So when did they stop making pull tabs on beer cans?

The answer is not as simple as you might think. Pull tabs were phased out of production in the 1970s and 1980s, but there are still a few brands that use them today.

What is a pull tab?

The pull tab on a can of beer is a small, metal disk with a ring attached to it. This disk is inserted into the top of the can so that when the can is opened, the ring pulls up the tab, allowing access to the beer. The pull tab became popular because it was easy to use and did not require a can opener. However, the pull tab had several disadvantages. First, the sharp edges of the metal disk could cut the drinker’s fingers. Second, the metal disk could fall into the can and contaminate the beer. Finally, the pull tab could be accidentally swallowed. In 1975, Hulseman invented the stay-tab, which addressed these problems. The stay-tab is a plastic ring that is attached to the can’s lid. When the can is opened, the ring stays in place, eliminating the potential for cuts and contamination. The stay-tab is still used today on most beer cans.

Are pull tab cans still made?

Although pull tabs are no longer as popular as they once were, there are still a few brands that use them. Miller Brewing Company was one of the last holdouts, but switched to stay-tabs in 2007. Other brands, such as Pabst Brewing Company and Schlitz, also continue to use pull tabs. However, the majority of beer cans today are opened with a can opener or a church key.

History of Beer Cans

Beer Cans were first introduced in the United States in 1935 by Gottfried Krueger Brewing Company, followed by Continental Can Company a year later. The first beer cans were made of steel and had a soldered on top. These “flat top” cans were popular until the late 1950s when “cone top” cans were introduced. Cone top cans had a removable top that was held on by a small metal tab.

In the early 1960s, aluminium cans were introduced and quickly became the preferred choice for beer cans due to their lighter weight and lower production costs. The first aluminium can was produced by Kaiser Aluminum in 1959, but it wasn’t until 1963 that the first beer was canned in an aluminium can.

The pull tab was invented in 1962 by Ermal Fraze of Kettering, Ohio. The first beer canned with a pull tab was Iron City Beer, produced by the Pittsburgh Brewing Company in 1963. Pull tabs quickly became popular and by the late 1960s, most beer cans were equipped with them.

In 1975, the “stay-tab” was introduced as an alternative to the pull tab. Stay-tabs are still used today, but most beer cans now have a “pop-top” that can be easily opened with no need for a separate opener.

The First Beer Can

The first beer cans were introduced in the United States in 1935. They were made of steel and lined with enamel to prevent rusting. The cans were sealed with a soldered on top that had to be opened with a church key can opener. These “flat top” cans were popular until the late 1950s when “cone top” cans were introduced.

Cone top cans had a removable top that was held on by a small metal tab. The tabs were inserted into a slot in the can and then pulled to open the can. Cone top cans were popular because they could be resealed if necessary.

When did ring pulls change on drinks cans?

The first ring pull can opener was invented in 1962 by Robert Hirsch of Duluth, Minnesota. Prior to this, people had to use a church key or other sharp object to open their cans. The ring pull made it much easier to open a can, and soon became the standard for all canned beverages.

However, in recent years there has been a shift away from ring pull cans. Many companies are now using “stay-on-tabs” or “Easy Open Lids” instead. These lids do not have a ring that can be pulled off, and instead must be peeled back.

When did cans have pop tops?

The first “pop top” can was introduced in 1962 by Ermal Fraze of Dayton, Ohio. Prior to this, all canned beverages required a can opener. The pop top made it much easier to open a can, and soon became the standard for all canned beverages.

When did Coors start using pull tabs?

Coors start using pull tabs on their cans in 1963. Prior to this, all canned beverages required a can opener. The ring pull made it much easier to open a can, and soon became the standard for all canned beverages.

Which states have pull tabs?

There is no definitive answer to this question, as pull tabs are not regulated by the government. However, it is generally accepted that most states allow pull tabs on canned beverages. Some states, such as California, have laws that specifically prohibit the use of pull tabs on cans.

How can I tell how old a beer can is?

The best way to determine the age of a beer can is to look for the manufacturer’s code. This code can usually be found on the bottom of the can. The first two digits of the code indicate the month, and the last two digits indicate the year. For example, a code of “0319” would indicate that the can was manufactured in March of 2019.

When did Budweiser go to aluminum cans?

Budweiser started using aluminum cans in 1969. Prior to this, all of their canned beverages were packaged in steel cans. The switch to aluminum cans allowed Budweiser to save money on packaging and shipping costs. Additionally, aluminum cans are more durable than steel cans, and do not rust.

Are old empty beer cans worth anything?

Old empty beer cans can be worth a significant amount of money to collectors [1]. The value of a particular can depends on its age, condition, and rarity. Collectors will often pay hundreds or even thousands of dollars for rare and valuable cans.

Reference:

  1. https://antiques.lovetoknow.com/collectibles/how-vintage-beer-can-values-are-determined
Lauren Beck

Leave a Comment