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Can You Take Alcohol to Go From a Restaurant?

Last Updated on September 14, 2022 by Lauren Beck

The answer to this question depends on the state in which the restaurant is located. Some states allow restaurants to sell alcohol to-go, while others do not. If you’re unsure about the laws in your state, it’s best to check with the restaurant before ordering.

Can you take alcohol to-go from a restaurant in California?

Yes, you can take alcohol to-go from a restaurant in California. The state’s Alcoholic Beverage Control (ABC) agency allows restaurants to sell alcoholic beverages for consumption off premises.

Can you take alcohol drinks to-go in Florida?

No, you cannot take alcohol drinks to-go in Florida. The state’s Division of Alcoholic Beverages and Tobacco (ABT) does not allow restaurants to sell alcoholic beverages for consumption off premises.

Can you take alcohol to-go from a restaurant in GA?

In some states, including Georgia, the laws regarding the sale of alcohol to-go from restaurants are somewhat unclear. In general, it is recommended that you check with your local restaurant or state agency before attempting to take alcohol drinks to-go from a restaurant in this state.

Can you still get alcohol to-go in Texas?

Yes, you can still get alcohol to-go in Texas. The state’s Alcoholic Beverage Commission (TABC) has temporarily lifted the ban on alcoholic beverage sales for consumption off premises. This change is effective as of May 8, 2020.

Can restaurants deliver alcohol in Florida?

There is no definitive answer to this question, as laws regarding the sale of alcohol vary from state to state. In some states, including Florida, it may be possible for restaurants to deliver alcohol directly to customers’ homes or other locations. However, you should check with your local restaurant or state agency if you are interested in having alcohol delivered.

Does Texas still have the blue law?

The blue law is a term that refers to legislation in some states that prohibits the sale of alcohol for consumption on Sundays. At this time, it is unclear whether or not Texas still has any blue laws in effect. To learn more about the status of the blue law in your state, you should contact your local Alcoholic Beverage Commission (TABC).

What’s the earliest you can buy alcohol?

The earliest you can buy alcohol depends on the state in which you live. In some states, like Florida, the legal drinking age is 21 and alcohol can only be sold during certain hours. In other states, like Texas, the legal drinking age is 18 and there are no restrictions on when alcohol can be sold.

Can you sell alcohol online in Florida?

Yes, you can sell alcohol online in Florida as long as you have a valid license to do so. You will need to get a license from the Division of Alcoholic Beverages and Tobacco of the Florida Department of Business and Professional Regulation.

Can I drink alcohol on the street?

In most states, it is illegal to drink alcohol in public places, such as on the street or in parks. However, there are some exceptions to this rule. For example, in New Orleans, it is legal to drink alcohol in public as long as the container is resealable and you are not causing a disturbance.

What states can you walk around with alcohol?

It is legal to walk around with alcohol in many states as long as you are of legal drinking age and the container is sealed. However, there may be restrictions on where you can consume the alcohol, such as at a park or beach. Some states also have open container laws that prohibit people from carrying open containers of alcohol in cars, even if the alcohol is sealed. These states include Florida, Texas, and Illinois. Additionally, some states have laws that prohibit drinking in public places or on the street. These include California, New York, and Massachusetts.

Bottom line

The laws surrounding alcohol are complex and vary from state to state. If you are unsure about the laws in your area, it is best to err on the side of caution and not drink in public or carry open containers of alcohol.

Lauren Beck
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