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8 Best Steaks at Outback Steakhouse: Ranked

Last Updated on April 25, 2024 by Lauren Beck

Do you have a hankering for steak? Outback Steakhouse is your go-to place for scrumptious signature steaks.

Discover the best cuts, flavors, and textures that delight your taste buds. Dive into a steak experience like no other!

Top 8 Steaks at Outback Steakhouse

1. Ribeye

The first on our list is the Ribeye Steak. This well-marbled 14oz steak is one of the great steaks at Outback. It’s juicy, tender, and laced with different spices that make the meat tasty and savory.

Ribeye steak texture and juiciness always depend on your cooking preference. If you want a more juicy steak, go for medium rare and enjoy that red, watery center with cayenne pepper, coriander, and garlic flavors.

This delicious succulent steak costs roughly $25.49 per serving.

2. Outback Center-Cut Sirloin

The next on the list of best steaks is the Outback Center-Cut Sirloin.

If you want an inexpensive alternative for Ribeye, the Center-Cut is the perfect one we can recommend. You can choose between 7oz for around  $13.29 and 10oz for around $20.29 with side dishes.

This Center-Cut Sirloin or Top Sirloin is low in fat but will satisfy your food cravings for its lean, hearty, and full of flavor tenderness. 

3. Bone-in Ribeye

Next is another natural cut ribeye from Outback Steakhouse, the Bone-in Ribeye.

Spend an extra dollar for an extra deliciously marbled and maximum tenderness of steak with pouring rich flavors made of salt, crushed peppercorns, and balsamic vinegar.  

For at least $33.49, you’ll have a delicious 18 oz cut of steak that comes with freshly baked potato and blue cheese pecan spread or a seafood add-on.

4. Victoria’s Filet Mignon

Among all the Outback steaks, Victoria’s Filet Mignon is known for its tender and juicy thick cut.

It has a boneless center (6oz) that you can have for roughly $22.99 per serving with bread or salad on the sides.

It is one of those savory filet steaks in the Outback restaurant that you won’t regret spending your money on. Request it to cook on a medium rare to get a steamy, juicy, red center.

5. Melbourne Porterhouse

roasted steak with pepper and herbs

Like all the steaks on the Outback Steakhouse menu, the Melbourne Porterhouse can be served grilled or seared with your preferred flavor.

Outback’s Melbourne Porterhouse is about $34.99 (22oz). It is thick-seared cut with your favorite Aussie fries, mashed potato, salads, or any two side dishes you want.

A serving of it is a tasty and flavorful combination of filet tenderloin and NY strip.  

6. Bone-in New York Strip

Outback Steakhouse Bone-in NY strip has a distinctive, flavorful taste when fire-grilled.

Its 16oz succulent tender cut cost around $26.49, with two freshly made side dishes complimenting a glass of red wine. 

The New York Strip was labeled as the classic steak at Outback Steakhouse and in a different restaurant, seasoned and cooked with the right amount of salt, paprika, and black pepper. 

7. Seasoned and Seared Prime Rib

One of the best steaks on the menu is the Seasoned and Seared Prime Rib of Outback Steakhouse.

You can order it flame-grilled or pan-cooked with two side dishes and complement add-ons like bloomin’ onion and coconut shrimp.

This seared delight cut of steak weighs 8oz and costs at least $19.49 with made-to-order sides. You’ll have to add a few dollars for an extra two ounces of steak cut and the delicious low-fat chicken add-on.

8. Slow Roasted Prime Rib

The Outback Steakhouse Slow Roasted steak is one of their fast-selling signature steaks. Perfect to be combined with bread or cheese as a side dish.

The steak is seasoned with an herb crust and can be cooked between the original roasted or wood fire-grilled, depending on your food preference. 

This steak has the highest calories of 1400 per 16oz among other steaks on the menu and costs more or less $22.49. Beef contains iron and zinc, essential to our diet, but overconsumption may lead to complications [1].  

FAQs

What steak is Outback Steakhouse known for?

Outback Steak is known for its Bone-in and Boneless Ribeye. The two steaks made the Outback Steakhouse stand out because of their exquisite cut and tenderness. 

What is the best steak to order at Outback Steakhouse?

Slow Roasted is the best steak to order at Outback, especially if your target meal is high in calories but inexpensive. Its flavors and spices are worth every penny because of its fresh side dishes like baked potato, grilled asparagus, or any menu item you like.

Porterhouse steaks can be a little expensive but worth it for the T-bone. The New York strip is also worth discovering why it became a classic steak.

Does Outback Steakhouse use good-quality steaks?

Yes, the steaks in the Outback Steakhouse are all quality grade in terms of tenderness, juiciness, and flavor. Their steaks are well-marbled with a red center, indicating quality meat.

Good quality steak is well-marbled, indicating that it came from young and well-fed beef cattle [2].  But keep in mind that the tenderness and juiciness of the steak varies based on how you want it to be cooked.

What cut of meat does Outback use?

Outback Steakhouse offers a range of steak cuts like New York Strip, Ribeye, Sirloin, and Filet Mignon. Each cut has distinct qualities to cater to various preferences.

In Summary

In sum, the standout star at Outback Steakhouse is undoubtedly the Bone-in Ribeye. This masterfully cooked, generously marbled steak bursts with succulent flavors and tenderness, elevating your dining experience to new heights.

For around $50, you can relish the epitome of steak perfection, savoring the finest cut, texture, and flavors that Outback has to offer.

Enhance your feast by indulging in a bloomin’ burger, steakhouse mac, and the rich goodness of lump crab meat – a celebration of taste and quality that defines the Outback experience.

References:

  1. https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/foods/beef
  2. https://www.usda.gov/media/blog/2013/01/28/whats-your-beef-prime-choice-or-select
Lauren Beck

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